Word Con 1

This is the 2nd in a group of four posts that I am going to make about the WordCon event that I attended at my university.


I have to say, I really enjoyed Adam’s part in WordCon 1. I didn’t know that much about his journey to writing through being a musician and I like that it seems to be quite common for musicians to move into writing.

Unfortunately, Adam has informed me that he plays percussion and strings, and thus he and I can no longer be friends.

Nah, I’m kidding. It’s just that brass and strings have this sort of playful banter going on.

Anyway, Adam spoke about his journey to writing and I liked that he spoke about his uni time as being more enjoyable than high school. Because that is definitely what I’m experiencing. He mentioned how he went to Vic Uni, and it really resonated with me. When I was in school everyone knocked Vic Uni down to the ground, but Adam’s personal relationship with the school really highlights how much good it can do.

The other guy on the panel, André, is also a musician, though from what I gathered he plays the saxophone, which, hmmm.

But, he does play jazz. And my grandfather was a jazz pianist and he’s half the reason that my family is so musical anyway, so I can’t hate jazz musicians.

André did a degree in primary school teaching, and then dropped it when he realised that there is no logical reason to go back to primary school once you’ve already got out. I feel that.

He then moved into the Red Cross. And from there into publishing. André and Brad are the publishing gurus in this course according to Adam.

Brad was meant to be moderating, and whilst he did have some interesting things to add, he was not very good at it. He seemed to be doodling but he and André did have a good rapport going.

But that was fine because Adam and André had their own comments and interesting tidbits about their lives to comment on.

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About evy

I'm studying a bachelors of writing and publishing and this is a blog about various things I read and write.
This entry was posted in Writing and Publishing, Writing for Performance. Bookmark the permalink.

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